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Quick Tip Thursday

The Best Settings for Night Photography

Best Settings for Night Photography
Night photography is a fascinating genre of landscape photography. You're standing outside in total darkness but the camera display shows something else: a starry sky and the beauty surrounding you. Photographing the night sky isn't quite as straightforward as one might want, though. In fact, it is in many cases quite opposite of 'regular' landscape photography. Using the 'wrong' settings might...

How to Avoid Light Leaks for Long Exposure Photography

Avoid Light Leaks
Light leaks often occur when using filters to achieve long exposures. Even though the shot is perfectly planned out, it's a problem that requires a few extra steps to avoid. The main reason to prevent them is that they're nearly impossible to correct in post-processing. Other problems such as dust spots, hot pixels or color cast are easy to fix...

Saturation vs. Vibrance. What’s the Difference?

The Saturation and Vibrance sliders are well-known and used by photographers in all genres alike. But do you know the difference between them? If not, then you're not alone. In fact, the majority of us just play around with them until we find a combination that makes the image look good. For a more effective and professional workflow, though, I...

How to Remove Spots in Photoshop

Remove Dust Spots in Photoshop
No matter how often you clean the camera and lenses, and no matter how perfect the composition is, it's hard to avoid having a couple spots or areas you want to remove from a photo. Luckily, it's relatively easy to remove spots in Photoshop without leaving visible traces. Remove Dust Spots in Photoshop If you're a Lightroom user and all you want...

3 Quick Steps to Beautiful Long Exposure Photography

Beautiful Long Exposure Photography
Long Exposure Photography has become a popular niche and one that I often mention. It's a technique that has the potential to take your photography from boring to Wow! The best part is that it's not particularly hard to learn and, in reality, there are only a few steps to follow in order to get started. Let's take a look at the...

Cover the Viewfinder for Long Exposure Photography

Cover the Viewfinder Long Exposure Photography
When I purchased my first Neutral Density Filters several years ago and started experimenting with Long Exposure Photography, I became fascinated by the magical effects created with shutter speeds of 10, 30, 100 seconds or more. However, there was one particular problem that regularly occurred: an unwanted purple color/haze was covering parts of the image. It would become so visible...

How to Handle HUGE Image Files and View them in Lightroom

"Could not save because this document exceeded the 4GB limit for TIFF files" is an error you might have encountered if you work on large panoramas or use multiple layers when developing images in Photoshop. TIFF and PSD are the most common file types for photographers to save their developed files in but unfortunately they've got some restrictions: TIFF files...

Remove the Camera Strap for Long Exposure Photography

Remove the Camera Strap for Long Exposure Photography
In this week's Quick Tip Thursday we're one simple but important tip for long exposure photography: Remove the camera strap. Capturing razor-sharp images is something most photographers strive to do. Sturdy tripods, remote shutters, and mirror lockup are all used to achieve this but still, your image might not be razor sharp if you forget to do one simple thing. Remove...

Introduction to Quick Tip Thursday

Quick Tip Thursday
Happy New Year everyone! I hope you had a great holiday and perhaps you even managed to capture a few images as well. This is not going to be a regular tutorial but I want to quickly tell you about a new and exciting segment that will be happening on CaptureLandscapes in 2018: Quick Tip Thursday. Each Thursday, we'll publish one...

When to Use an Open Aperture in Landscape Photography

Open Aperture in Landscape Photography
"I am somewhat puzzled when I read about professional landscape photography where they use fast lenses such as f2.8 or f1.4. Why do they use these lenses when most landscape photos are taken anywhere from f8 to f22 and the supposed sweet spot is f11 (or close to it) to get good depth of field throughout. Where does the f/2.8 come in...

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